DIRENZA MK1 FORD FOCUS RS RACE MANIFOLD

The Imperial Blue automotive god that is the Mk1 Focus RS is regarded as a ‘proper’ flat-cap modern classic nowadays, with many commanding higher prices than the completely bonkers Mk2 versions.

With that in mind, many choose to keep theirs subtle with just a few well-chose tuning upgrades. And we reckon they don’t get any more well-chosen than this slick race manifold.

Designed to massively improve airflow and throttle response, this fully ported and polished, mandrel bent, tig-welded work of art uses thick 3mm stainless steel for superior reliability. It also has CNC machined flanges for solid support and an accurate fit. One for when only the finest will do for your pampered project.

Price £300

For more info see Direnza

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GM and Fiat Chrysler admit that they’re buying regulatory credits from Tesla

Being an automaker that exclusively produces all-electric vehicles, Tesla has been gaining significant revenue over the years by selling federal greenhouse gas credits to fellow carmakers, which are needed by the car companies to offset the sales of internal combustion vehicles in the US market. Filings earlier this year have revealed that two of Tesla’s most notable credit buyers are none other than General Motors Co. (GM) and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV (FCA).

In filings to the state of Delaware, GM and FCA disclosed that they have an agreement to purchase greenhouse gas credits from Tesla. These filings, while light on details, are nevertheless notable, as they confirm that even established, veteran carmakers such as GM and Fiat Chrysler are looking to Tesla as a means to comply with the United States’ environmental regulations.

FCA’s purchase of credits from Tesla is quite unsurprising considering that the company has already been revealed to have entered an estimated $500 million open pool deal with the Silicon Valley-based electric car maker for the European region, which would allow Fiat Chrysler to count Tesla’s vehicles as part of its fleet to avoid incurring emissions penalties. What was surprising about the Delaware filings was that GM was purchasing credits from Tesla as well.

GM, after all, has been producing the Chevy Volt plug-in hybrid and Chevy Bolt EV for the US market for years. Despite the recent retirement of the Volt, it was largely assumed that GM’s electric and electrified vehicle lineup would leave the automaker in the clear when it comes to regulatory compliance. Nevertheless, Mike Taylor, founder and president of Houston-based environmental credit consultant and broker Emission Advisors, noted that GM’s decision to purchase credits from Tesla could be part of the company’s preparations for the future, especially if political tides shift in the 2020 election. “This might not be a bad hedge. If a Democrat gets elected in 2020, GM may need the credits and prices may go up,” Taylor said.

This assumption appears to have been highlighted by GM spokesman Pat Morrissey. In a statement to Bloomberg, the spokesman noted that the credits GM bought from Tesla are insurance against “future regulatory uncertainties.” FCA spokesman Eric Mayne, for his part, indicated that US standards are getting stricter at a pace that “far exceeds” the current level of demand for electric cars that are required for compliance. “Until demand catches up with regulatory requirements, and there is regulatory relief, we will use credits as appropriate,” Mayne stated.

Tesla has not issued a comment about GM and FCA’s credit purchases so far, though it should be noted that Chief Financial Officer Zachary Kirkhorn pointed out during a call with prospective investors that sales of credits will be a more significant part of the electric car maker’s business in the following years. The previous quarters have proven lucrative for Tesla in this light, as the company reported $216 million in revenue from the sale of regulatory credits in the first quarter alone.

Automakers in the United States appear to be dependent on credits to meet the country’s regulations so far. For the 2017 model year, for example, all American automakers were found to have complied with US rules, though the EPA has noted that most large car companies used credits to meet the requirements.

GM and Fiat Chrysler admit that they’re buying regulatory credits from Tesla

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First trailer, photos released for “Ford v. Ferrari” film

The first trailer and photos for “Ford v. Ferrari” have been released ahead of the film’s debut in the United States this fall.

The movie is a retelling of Ford’s triumph over Ferrari at the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans and stars Matt Damon as Carroll Shelby and Christian Bale as Ken Miles. Shelby requires no introduction, though for those who don’t know, Miles was Shelby’s good friend and test driver.

Scene from “Ford v. Ferrari” movie

Scene from “Ford v. Ferrari” movie

Other famous personalities being portrayed include auto industry heavyweight Lee Iacocca, played by Jon Bernthal, and Henry Ford II, played by Tracy Letts. And while we don’t see him in the trailer or photos, Enzo Ferrari will also make an appearance, played by Remo Girone.

We should point out that the film won’t center on the drivers who fought it out at the 1966 Le Mans race. Instead, it will focus on the gritty life of building the Ford GT40, which came first, second and third overall.

Scene from “Ford v. Ferrari” movie

Scene from “Ford v. Ferrari” movie

In an interview with Entertainment Weekly published in May, Bale jokingly said, “It’s these two friends figuring out how do you deal with these a-holes in suits who know nothing about racing.”

Of course, the racing will be featured as well. Director James Mangold, who was at the helm of the film “Logan,” said he applied lessons from that film to “Ford v. Ferrari.” Instead of relying too much on CGI, viewers will see a stripped-down approached which is designed to make the action feel more realistic. We’re talking real cars on real racetracks.

Scene from “Ford v. Ferrari” movie

Scene from “Ford v. Ferrari” movie

In the same Entertainment Weekly interview, Damon explained, “To feel those cars come roaring by is why people love racing. It was really exciting to shoot because it didn’t require you to use your imagination, it was all happening around you.”

The film is shaping up to be a favorite of auto enthusiasts this year. Fans can catch it in theaters across the U.S. from November 15.

Scene from “Ford v. Ferrari” movie

Scene from “Ford v. Ferrari” movie

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